Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day was celebrated on Sunday 29th April 2018, and photographers across the globe took the opportunity to get out and about with their pinhole cameras. Lens-less photography comes in all varieties from analogue homemade tins or boxes, bespoke wooden pinhole cameras, to digital conversions. My favourite choice of camera for the day was my old Polaroid Pinhole 100 camera. The real joy of experimenting with this camera is that it uses an analogue Type 100 instant peel-apart film, so for creative exposures the print can be viewed following just 60 seconds development. Negative and print sheets are sandwiched together in the film pack, exposed in camera before being pulled out through rollers, which spreads a pod of chemical gel between the two sheets, developing the image. The sandwich is then pulled apart to reveal a processed print and negative sheet.

Sadly Polaroid instant Type 100 film has not been in production for some years now, and Fuji have just recently discontinued manufacture of their last film in this format. Once my refrigerated expired stock of these films is finally used up, this little camera will become redundant, without some engineered structural modification to use an alternative film format. One slight positive will be that I will then be able fit some food back in my fridge, but that is only if I do not manage to locate a further source of film stock to fill it with!

For the past few years here in the UK it seems to have been grey and wet weather for Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, and this year was no different, but shooting beneath a tree canopy helped to shelter camera and instant prints from the worst of the rainfall. Despite the overcast skies, I was still achieving 6-8 minute exposures on the Fuji made film. Multiple exposures under the trees created an ethereal image with subtle layers and an impression of movement from the passage of a breeze through the leaves.

Direct scans from the Fuji fp-100c type 100 instant print images shot on 29th April for Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day. One image will soon be uploaded to the WPPD gallery: http://pinholeday.org/

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Photography in the Palm Court

Excited to have four images included in the photo club group exhibition installed in the Palm Court restaurant at The Grand on the Leas, Folkestone today.
Entry to the exhibition is free during hotel opening times, and the c-type prints previewed here are available to buy framed direct from The Grand at £75 each – if you are interested in making a purchase, please speak to a member of staff in the Palm Court.
The Grand, The Leas, Folkestone CT20 2XL www.grand-uk.com

Then and Now
The Lookout
Conversation with a Shadow

A Grand Exhibition

A Grand Exhibition – An exhibition of photography by local photographers.
11th – 24th April
In The Ballroom at The Grand, The Leas, Folkestone, Kent.
Free entry 9-4pm daily

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Folkestone Photographic Exhibition 2014

Photos from Folkestonians, A community photographic exhibition in the heart of the creative quarter November/December 2014 with images from novice to professional members of our Photographic Collective – Folkestone Chapter.

A chance to purchase images and meet local photographers from novice to professional and share works, ideas and feedback.

56-58 The Old High Street, Folkestone, Kent
Open daily from 10am – 4pm

We would like to invite you to join us at the opening of the 2014 exhibition on Saturday 15th November from 6pm – 8pm, where you can enjoy a private viewing of the photography on display. There will also be the opportunity to meet and chat with the exhibiting photographers.

Please confirm your attendance by RSVP to mariannecox20@yahoo.co.uk as the private view event is guest list only.

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We look forward to seeing you at this event and throughout the 3 weeks of the exhibition.
Photographic Collective – Folkestone Chapter.

If you are a local photographer and would like to join the club please also see our facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1380720565501244/

Art on Romney Marsh

Roberta Harrold and Mike Tedder have spent time travelling around the Romney Marshes, either together or separately, discovering the light and spirit of the landscape. They present an exhibition of photography, collage, drawing and language which reflects their experiences through an imaginative use of different but complimentary media and styles. They bring together these sometimes pictorial or abstract images to reflect both the serious and humorous aspects of a journey undertaken.

Roberta Harrold studied graphic design at Medway College of Design and Mike Tedder studied fine art at Anglia Ruskin University. They have both exhibited in a number of group exhibitions and had solo shows of their work.

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Photographs, drawings, collages from journeys by Roberta Harrold & Mike Tedder
1st September to 28th September 2014
Open: Friday, Saturday, Sunday 10 am to 4 pm
THE ART SHACK Romney Marsh Visitors Centre, Dymchurch Road, New Romney, Romney Marsh TN28 8AY
For further information contact: Artshackkent.co.uk

Perambulations with a pinhole

I had an exciting day experimenting with my Polaroid 100 pinhole camera, and some Fuji FP-100c type 100 peel apart instant film, to celebrate Worldwide Pinhole Day 2013 on 28th April. The Polaroid pinhole camera, a little white compact plastic box with a film holder attached, is really easy to use: firstly covering the pinhole, while sliding back the dark slide, having determined exposure time for the f220 pinhole in seconds, before covering and returning the dark slide to its closed position. The film sheet can then be pulled from the camera, activating development, timed to current ambient temperature, before finally peeling apart and voila! a fabulous glossy print is revealed.

The day was cold and windy, but fortunately bright; allowing for exposures of between 3 and 8 seconds. Working with peel apart film is always somehat more challenging in windy conditions: getting the caustic gel covered waste parts safely into a bag, while ensuring the print is secure in a drying rack to avoid marking the damp surface (a Cokin filter box is perfect for portable drying/storage). Using instant film is however always exciting. There is an analogue pleasure in the performance/process, then the moment of excitement and anticipation while peeling apart the film layers, revealing the finished print with an immediacy that is rather more akin to the expediency of digital photography.

There is something rather special about the fact that the Polaroid or instant image is complete: finished. There is no altering, or post processing possible. The print is the final outcome, a one-off unique edition of one.

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Too Late for the train – Folkestone Harbour Station
Polaroid 100 pinhole camera: 4 seconds at f200: Fuji FP-100c instant film
Pinhole size: 0.3mm: Focal length: 60mm
Submitted to the Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day 2013 gallery:
http://www.pinholeday.org/gallery/2013/